‘First of its kind’ home health monitoring to expand in central Alberta


A remote health monitoring project is expanding to more rural areas in the province after two primary care networks (PCNs) successfully tested the technology in July 2020.

The project allows patients to upload, view, and keep track of daily health data results, such as temperature and blood pressure, and follow-up with clinicians from home.

The Alberta Central Zone PCN Home Health Monitoring Project is the “first of its kind” in the province — it aims to improve the care of patients living with chronic health conditions, as well as minimize the risk of exposure to COVID-19.

The current phase of the project includes an expansion to six additional central Alberta PCNs, with the goal of enrolling 500 patients over 20 months.

"The project works with health companies, agencies, and clinicians to improve care management for patients in a sustainable way," said Reg Joseph, CEO of Health City.

"Demonstrating the viability of home health monitoring in central Alberta could generate widespread adoption of the care model, leading to more affordable and efficient care for patients, and better health outcomes within the province while serving as a national model of care delivery for patients in rural areas.”

An Alberta-based remote health monitoring project is expanding to more rural areas in the province. (Courtesy of Health City)

An Alberta-based remote health monitoring project is expanding to more rural areas in the province. (Courtesy of Health City)

The initiative is a partnership between Health City, Alberta Central zone primary care networks, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Telus Health, along with Alberta Innovates, Alberta Health Services, and the provincial government.

"This system allows primary care network chronic disease teams to efficiently support large numbers of patients at one time. Over several months of monitoring, feedback, and education from their primary care team, patients are empowered to use home health monitoring equipment to gain control over their own health conditions," said Dr. Steven Turner, associate medical director for Alberta’s Central zone.

According to Health City, there are more than 40 PCNs in the province that serve approximately 3.8 million Albertans.